Mr Boles came to the attention of the national media earlier this year for labelling countryside campaigners as “hysterical, scaremongering latter-day Luddites.”

A spokesman for the National Trust pointed out this morning on BBC Radio Four’s Today programme, that Mr Boles’ ‘initiative’ would mean land the size of Cornwall, gets concreted over.

Neil Parish MP recently wrote to Mr Boles to investigate the widely derided Wainhomes planning appeal decision, which has allowed 50 houses on high quality agricultural land at Feniton, where water has been pouring off the last few days.

Rather than answer Mr Parish’s letter and take responsibility for the inspectorate’s decision (it is after all, based on the very controversial National Planning Policy Framework that came into force in March this year), Mr Boles has instead simply forwarded the letter to the Planning Inspectorate for them to answer.

Unsurprisingly, the Planning Inspectorate has confirmed that its decision was based on the new pro-growth policies dictated by Mr Boles’ own government.

Mr Boles’ appointment to the role of planning minister has been met with considerable concern by those who would like to see a balanced approach to development.  Countryside campaigners, such as the National Trust, are said to be on high alert, since David Cameron invited Mr Boles to take up the job a few weeks ago.

The full story in today’s Telegraph is HERE.