So the prime minister has just negotiated a deal with the EU.

But I’m already alarmed at how the government is threatening parliament over this new withdrawal agreement, which is set to be voted on, on Saturday.

Jean Claude Junker says he rules out an extension, HOWEVER, BBC Europe Editor, Katya Adler is tweeting that the rest of the 27 member states may yet take a different view.

It appears that it if approved, the deal would signal the end of the United Kingdom due to the customs arrangements for Ireland, allowing the rest of the UK to leave the customs union – something the hardline Brexiter MPs have campaigned hard on.

The Economist has already denounced the deal as “economically worse for Britain than one negotiated by Theresa May last year.”

There are also many unanswered questions relating to employment rights and environmental protections, for which campaigners have consistently called to be at least as protective as the EU’s.

Not only that but a massive and complex document is expected to be read, considered and voted on, with less than two days notice!

Legal experts have already taken legal action to attempt to prevent MPs from debating on Saturday, as bullying ministers present the situation as Deal or No Deal.

But the numbers do not appear to looking hopeful for Mr Johnson’s deal within the commons.

The DUP alone has made it clear its members will vote against it.

And of the 24 Independent MPs, most former Conservatives, many are now inclined towards a confirmatory vote instead.

Barrister, Jolyon Maugham states: “Here we are, after three and a half years, and it looks as though Parliament will be asked to approve on Sat a 500+ page document which it has not seen (indeed which does not yet exist) with epochal consequences for Great Britain, Northern Ireland and the EU and in short time…”

“What is the rush?” Asks Mr Maugham, when the EU is already set to agree an extension, which Mr Johnson is required to ask for to should he not get his deal through parliament.

So what IS the rush? As usual it’s all about the Brexit Party.

Farage is already scathing about the deal, apparently believing it to be not Brexity enough.

All he appears to want is for the UK to leave without a withdrawal agreement, despite all the terrible chaos that would cause.

If the UK does leave the EU on 31 October, Farage is weakened. And the Tories hope to romp home in an imminent general election.

Interestingly, numbers in the Commons now appear to be shifting in the direction of a confirmatory vote.

I voted remain in the referendum, and I have campaigned with Devon for Europe for a second referendum.

We have a deal on the table. And however poor we regard it to be, we now need to put it back to the people.

Given the overwhelming concern about the impact Brexit would have on this country, and now we have a deal (another one!), it is appropriate and democratic to give people a final say, with two options on the ballot paper.  This withdrawal agreement and remain.

If the 27 EU member states back democracy they will allow an extension to allow this withdrawal agreement to be put to a confirmatory vote.  It’s absolutely crucial in my view.

More democracy cannot be undemocratic!

Importantly though, in any second referendum there MUST be new strict electoral rules about honesty, truthfulness and integrity in the campaigns of all those involved, with prison sentences for anyone found to have breached those rules.

I would, of course, campaign to remain in any second and final referendum.