So Boris Johnson becomes our new prime minister.

Just three years ago this would have been unthinkable.

Laughable in fact.

But the conservative party has allowed one man – Farage – to shift this country’s politics to the extreme right, with the result that we are now on course to leave the EU without a withdrawal agreement on 31 October, which will almost certainly lead to a recession and serious economic hardship.

Mr Johnson arrives at a time of unprecedented political turmoil. The government has been described as being in almost a continuous constitutional crisis this year, with an incredible number of ministerial resignations.

And they continue, yesterday two members of the cabinet resigned, and today two more have gone.

Chancellor, Philip Hammond, declared on Marr on Sunday that he would resign tomorrow before Boris Johnson officially takes up the reins as prime minister.

More could follow.

Johnson wants to change the withdrawal agreement so significantly, the EU will never agree to it.

He knows this, but pretends it’s possible anyway.

So in his typical blustering-light-on-honesty-fashion Johnson has already committed to taking the UK out of the EU on 31 October regardless.

But parliament simply won’t wear his dictatorship tactics of attempting to suspend parliament to allow this to happen.

The staid Philip Hammond is now viewed by the party as the potential leader of a rebellion against the new prime minister.

Around 14 Tory MPs would need to vote with Labour, the LibDems and the SNP, in a vote of no confidence.

But there is now speculation that history could be made and senior conservative MPs could actually vote with the opposition to bring down the government, in order to prevent a catastrophic no deal Brexit.

So, what does the new PM do faced with this possibility?

YouGov polls are predicting a landslide in a general election for the Tories with Johnson at the helm.

It would surely be tempting for him to call a general election himself in the hope of shifting the parliamentary arithmetic in his favour, pre-empting any vote of no confidence.

Certainly, what’s clear to me is that the reason this man is now our PM is because the conservative party membership believe he can decisively win a general election.

It’s not even about Brexit for people like Johnson and many Tory MPs. That’s just a tool for control. It’s about one thing only – defeating Farage.

It’s only ever been about defeating Farage.

A deeply unworthy man will now hold the highest office in the land and watching his speech this morning I felt an energy shift.

I can already feel the winds of change blowing.

The likelihood of a general election in the autumn draws ever closer.

I have been preparing for some time.

And I’ll be ready.

Pic: The East Devon Parliamentary 2017 general election declaration